Bremont Jumping On The 70s Trend With Newest Supernova Midnight

Credit: Bremont

Not willing to miss out on the 70s design trend manifesting in the world of luxury sports watches, Bremont have released their latest integrated bracelet steel sports watch, joining the ranks of the Royal Oak, the Overseas and the Nautilus in a bid to secure a place alongside the classic nautical-themed and named watches. However as Bremont was born out of a background of love and passion for flying and vintage aviation, I’m hoping the irony is deliberate.  

Don’t get me wrong. You tease the ones you love most (so I was led to believe) and I have a genuine affection for the brand and their founders. And it’s great to see that they’ve put a lot of effort into making something seemingly familiar, yet distinctively Bremont at the same time, without losing the characteristics of either.

I won’t go into the details of the watch as I’m sure you can see from the images and the very detailed regurgitation of press releases from other online sources. What I will do is to bring out the main talking points so you get a quick rundown of the features without the need to wade through hundreds of flowery adjectives and end up not knowing little more than when you started.

  • Heavily angled down “lugs” so the watch sits nicely and lugs your wrist, and will sit better than the 53mm lug-to-lug length suggests. Case diameter of 40mm and a relatively low 11mm thickness plus water resistant to 100m.
  • Bremont manufacture movement with 65 hours power reserve at a funky 25,200 VPH
  • The watch is proudly made in England
  • The complex case design – like the AP Code11:59, the best way to view the case, appreciate the engineering and design is from the side. From here you can catch the complexity of the Bremont Trip-Tick case (basically the lugs and the bezel are a single piece rather than the usual design where the lugs are attached to the middle case). The intricate curves and chamfers shows that time, sweat, and tears has been invested, and it’s more than just a me-too product.

Another point which really irks me is that it looked like everyone else just quoted the Bremont H1 timing stand, an equivalent to the ISO3159:2009 standard, and just left it at that, assuming all of us knows exactly what the standard is because we’re all completely well versed in ISO standards… 

And it wasn’t easy to find either. Many of the official websites that offers the ISO testing standards makes you buy it before you can find out what it is. However, a bit of persistence on Google and voila. Basic summary here for you for free. As you can see it is more or less the same as COSC. slightly less rigorous.

Credit: govbergwatches.com

The ISO standard is of course, an international standard and in a way, for a British watch brand, to not rely on the Swiss accuracy testing services in COSC, Time Lab or otherwise is quite apt. We’ll just ignore the fact that ISO is based in Geneva… 

It was also pointed out to me that the Brits have one of the most stringent testing available – the Kew “A” certification. The Kew Observatory was responsible for certifying marine chronometers before they were issued to the navy. The Kew test lasted for 44 days compared to 15 in the Swiss version. Any watch certified as an “A” chronometer from the Kew Observatory was known to be extremely accurate and robust in all positions in a wide range of temperatures. That would’ve been quite something. 

The Supernova is available now to order from the Bremont website at £7,995 ($12,995 AUD) and is assembled to order with delivery around 4-6 weeks.

For more, check out the Hublot Big Bang Unico Gourmet made with Damascus Steel. 

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