Maserati Grecale: A (Slightly) More Affordable Maserati

Credit: Maserati

Maserati have unveiled their newest and most affordable model available, the Maserati Grecale, and it doesn’t skimp out on the power end either.

Named after the strong and cool Mediterranean wind, the Maserati Grecale exemplifies that dichotomy. It’s unfortunate that the car had to be delayed due to the industry’s computer chip shortage but here we are four months later, and it looks impressive.

This new car is similar to the Maserati Levante (also named after a Mediterranean wind) but is more compact. It seems that Maserati are trying to take on the Porsche Macan in the luxury compact SUV market. And Porsche are in for some competition as Maserati’s second all-new model in five years hits the market.

Credit: Maserati

Price won’t be an issue as the Grecale is Maserati’s most affordable car in their line-up, meaning that it is very competitive in comparison to the Porsche with an estimated price for the base model around $87,000 AUD. The base model Macan sits at $84,800 AUD. This is the only offering from Maserati that’s under $100,000.

Now that Maserati is owned by the multinational car maker, Stellantis, they’ve adapted already existing Alfa Romeo tech to create the Grecale. They didn’t pinch their ideas from Alfa Romeo as all they did was take the basis of the Alfa Romeo Giulia and Telvio SUV and make dramatic changes to the chassis components. The most important of which is the longer wheelbase which creates greater distance between the front and rear acles to provide an improved interior space. Maserati have claimed that this means the Grecale’s interior is the best in its class.

Credit: Maserati

Speaking of the interior, Maserati have overhauled their own infotainment tech to match their competitors. It’s now an Android Automotive-powered system that Maserati claim is just as fast and responsive as any smartphone or tablet. They’re so confident about this that they are making it the default on all their models going forward. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto will be used to connect smartphones to the enlarged 12.3-inch touchscreen. This screen does replace the analog clock that most Maserati purists might be mad about as this is the first time they have removed it.

The Grecale will have a range of powertrains: a combustion engine, mild hybrid, and a fully electric Foglore model that has yet to be released.

There are three versions of the Grecale: the urban GT, an outdoor focused Modena, and the performance focused Trofeo. The Trofeo is particularly impressive with its 523hp V6 that’s based on the MC20 Nettuno. It can reach 100km/h in just 3.6 seconds for a top speed of 285km/h and delivers 390kW.

The Modena and GT are equipped with updated versions of the turbo 2.0-litre with a low-voltage hybrid system used in both the Ghibli and Levante. The Modena can pump out 243kW, and the GT 221kW.

Credit: Maserati

All three feature all-wheel drive and an eight-speed automatic transmission. The Trofeo, however, is the only one with air-spring suspension as standard.

The design is influenced by Maserati’s own fantastic looking MC20. In terms of design, it wipes the floor with the Macan. It’s bolder, more exaggerated, and more importantly, it doesn’t look like a regular sports car shoved into the chassis of an SUV. It looks stylish yet powerful, something that plenty of other brands have failed to achieve even if there is power underneath the less than stylish design.

Just like its namesake, the Grecale is strong and cool.

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