LEGO, according to a new study, tends to offer better returns than if you had invested the same amount into gold.

It’s pretty nuts that those little plastic bricks can bring you a better return than if you had invested the money in gold. Well, that’s according to a study done by HSE University in Moscow.

Victoria Dobrynskaya and Julia Kishilova published their paper in the journal, Research in International Business and Finance. They posit that,

“Iconic toys with diminishing over time supply and high collectible values appear to yield high returns on the secondary market. We find that LEGO investments outperform large stocks, bonds, gold, and alternative investments, yielding an average return of at least 11% in the sample period 1987-2015.”

So should you be dropping all your other investments like a bad smell? Not just yet. The authors found that there was a significant variation within those returns which could range from -50% to +600% annually.

Prices of small and very big sets grow faster than the medium-sized ones do. The authors argue that this is likely due to the small sets having unique parts, and the big ones being produced in smaller quantities while also being more attractive to adults.

The big money, though, is in the thematic sets dedicated to “famous buildings, popular movies, or seasonal holidays.” These show the highest amount of growth on the secondary market.

Would you like to guess what the most expensive sets are? I’m sure it’s fairly obvious… It’s Star Wars stuff, of course! The Millennium Falcon, Death Star II, and Imperial Star Destroyer rank among the most expensive sets.

To summarise in Victoria Dobrynskaya’s words,

“Investors in LEGO generate high returns from reselling unpacked sets, particularly rare ones, which were produced in limited editions or a long time ago. Sets produced 20-30 years ago make LEGO fans nostalgic, and prices for them go through the roof. But despite the high profitability of LEGO sets on the secondary market in general, not all sets are equally successful, and one must be a real LEGO fan to sort out the market nuances and see the investment potential in a particular set.”

So start doing your LEGO homework if this is something you’re willing to get into. Who knows, it might be less risky than investing in crypto?

Speaking of fun new studies, this one just confirmed that Australia is indeed a nation of pissheads. 

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